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and getting us out of your on-time -- out of here on time. i appreciate the lead for a really great organization. for those of you interested in district 6, we are having a debate here on october 7, 6:00 here. thank you very much. [applause] >> we are just going to say good night here. one more paragraph. on behalf of the league of women voters and our partner organizations, the potrero hill organization of businesses, the dog patch organization, the university of california san francisco, media sponsors nbc bay area -- we are proud to be here -- san francisco government television and educational access tv, and certainly, our thanks to the candidates for participating and thanks to you for being here tonight, informing yourself, being good citizens of san francisco. good night, everyone. [applause] >> good afternoon, everyone. if you would take your seats for this incredibly happy occasion. i am the director of the san francisco department of public health, and i want you to think back 13 years, because that is when i began. and when i started, the very first crisis i had to deal w
outlived its usefulness as a place for residents to live. it was no longer consistent with any medicare or medicaid rules. we were the only facility left in the country running open wards. we were told we would not be allowed any longer by both the federal and state authorities. it was a place where, while the care was wonderful, the building did not fit any modern earthquake standards. where privacy was insufficient to support human dignity. where people did not have a place to store their stuff. where people did not have a window to look out on. where we had to have wards that had closing doors because there was not that easy access to the outside. here we had a vibrant set of people -- residents, nurses, doctors, attendants -- but what we lacked was a space that was equal to them. with that, i hope all of you -- looking around the crowd, so many of you did to make this reality. derek parker set the vision of every room with a window. whether it is one of you who voted for this, or one of our wonderful residents who has been a volunteer here. all of you had a role in creating that fac
they can help /thefplgz. themselves. if you can help yourself you take a load off of us. yourself, your neighbors a few hours after, we know that [inaudible] activated a few times for y 2 k after 911 we had people. the [inaudible] has not know tried yet if you go there after a disaster you will be by yourself. a few hours after, that's when people form and that's when they help out. >> this is the home work. you don't have to write it down it's in the manual. simple things for your home. hazardous conditions in our house. there is a course evaluation in the back of the book. i'm rob [laughter]. >> okay. let's get into the program today is utility control and fire hazard material. we will teaching how to turn your utility's off and what hazardous materials to look for. >> the first thing is natural gas. what do you know about natural gas? flammable. it goes, boom. it's important to shut this off. we use it for cooking, eating and hot water. there were 40,000 people that called pg and e about their gas. that means they call turned off their gas? did they need to do that? when do you ha
, sometimes crushingly difficult, have brought many of us here at last to laguna honda. not at last for some of us. despite all differences, we need the healing that laguna honda is famous for. some people who come will be rehabilitated and will leave sunday. others will need 24-hour care for the rest of their lives, and so they will look forward to spending time in the spending -- in this building for years to come. it is exciting to have a new building. it is even more exciting to receive a new model of care, care that is resident centered, care that honors each person as an individual instead of a body in a bed. care that involves talking to us, and more important, listening to us, hearing our voices. so many have worked so hard, has you have been told -- as you have been told, to bring the state to pass. and now we have a dazzling new setting to present to you. when you leave today, you will be going home. but laguna honda residents will not be leaving. this is our home. and it is very important to us. we are already here. but please come back and visit us frequently. this wonderful new
and a guy says, "i spent all this time using alcohol and drugs and shooting up, etc., etc., so i finally get into treatment only to discover that i have hepatitis c." so we want to have that as an integral part because that becomes part of the cultural dynamic. and especially from a religious point of view, because you start feeling that you've been visited by god in a negative way because after all, you finally get your life on a proper course, and boom, you've got to deal with either hiv or you've got to deal with the hepatitides. and when you are dealing with that, that becomes an important part. and the other factors in that sort of i've been doomed by god is also age. as you get older, your body responds differently and what we're finding epidemiologically is that we've got a whole cohort of baby boomers who are flirting with marijuana, prescription drugs and other substances, misuse of alcohol, because they still think they are 25. and they have disposable incomes. and they have the disposable incomes associated with that. so we're finding then this uptick in use of marijuana and other
is upon us. it is happening fast. those of us who live in coastal areas will fill the affect of that first. we want to recognize the mayor's leadership in not just the opportunity of building such an important structure -- this is the first leed certified hospital in the state of california, and what that means is the rebuilding of the entire campus is to provide respect, dignity, and validation for all of the residents who will be here at laguna honda, but next importantly that we build something that will come from its conception, enhance the conservation of the water is an energy used in this building, and enhance the co2 emission reductions of this building. mayor, thank you for walking the walk as well as talking the talk. it is something to be proud of, leed-certified. to all the care givers and all the volunteers who make up the family of residents, to express our appreciation for your long hours and for your selfless service, and know that the battles that senator yee and assembly men andiano and i are putting in sacramento right now -- if we let governor have his -- if we let the
that involves talking to us, and more important, listening to us, hearing our voices. so many have worked so hard, has you have been told -- as you have been told, to bring the state to pass. and now we have a dazzling new setting to present to you. when you leave today, you will be going home. but laguna honda residents will not be leaving. this is our home. and it is very important to us. we are already here. but please come back and visit us frequently. this wonderful new laguna honda would not exist without you. i just want to add a personal note. my younger sister, emily, was a resident here for many more years than i have been. she was greatly loved. we lost her recently. i would like to dedicate this speech to her and remembered her, as many of the residents do, with great fondness and affection. thank you all. [applause] >> i would like to invite you all nowi that good enough? this is a participatory ribbon cutting. it requires nothing more complicated than this. i will ask you to count down, not up. upon conclusion, we will applaud the great works of turner construction, the dedicat
misconceptions' because we are not doing our part to help change it. if that is true, i want jerry to tell us whether or not he agrees with that assessment. >> do you agree with that? >> jonathan said something that i absolutely agree with. that is the media reflects what the public wants. in my view, the media, in general, feed a voracious appetite for vengeance by an informed public. often influenced by fear, prejudice, and ignorance. i think one of the reasons criminal defense lawyers argued so poorly is people do not understand the source of crime. they want simple, quick responses to a complicated long- term solutions. you cannot fight crime by doing what the governor is doing, cutting social services and building new prisons. [applause] you do not have to be a rocket scientist to understand. all of us who have been involved in the criminal-justice system know where people who commit crimes come from. they are poor people, people of color, victims of abuse, the mentally ill, people with substance abuse problems. there are the people that fall through the cracks of society. but that is th
will be talking about diversity issues within the addiction and recovery field. joining us in our panel today are dr. h. westley clark, director, center for substance abuse treatment, substance abuse and mental health services administration, u.s. department of health and human services, rockville, maryland. marco e. jacome, chief executive officer, healthcare alternative systems incorporated, chicago, illinois. john de miranda, president and ceo, stepping stone, san diego, california. william lossiah-bratt, board of directors, southeastern regional representative, faces and voices of recovery, cherokee, north carolina. dr. clark, why should we be concerned about ethnic and racial differences within the addiction and recovery field, as well as other differences? well, one of the things that we want to make sure is that people who have substance use problems are able to recover and that materials that we use can assist them in that process. and so, you know, there are differences associated with cultural values and beliefs, starting from how one physiologically responds to a particular substan
for one year. we came up with the notion of shipping containers. it was important for us that we made this project for the place, of the place. what i mean by that is participants would also used repurchased materials. >> we will be speaking to one of the artists that you selected. what excited you about his idea? >> have many things. first of all, i am a fan of his architecture. because of that creativity, i knew that he could come up with something unique. i love the fact that he was specifically addressing the landscape around here, and it was also about the human interaction with this place. >> what are your expectations with the people coming to presidio habitat? >> we really hope people will come with their family, dogs, and come back a number of times the works will change over the year. the feedback we are getting is you cannot do all of them on one visit. it is really better to come back and have different experiences. >> thank you. i am with mark jensen of jensen architect. he was one of the architects to be chosen to do the presidio habitat. when you heard about this projec
about the program is the way it is set out allows us to treat the artworks that have the most need, the ones that our conservative have pointed out as the most vulnerable as opposed to ones that might be the most popular were the most miserable -- the most visible. >> it is an opportunity for the public to get involved with these art works located in their backyard and ultimately belong to them. >> i want to do something for the community, just giving back what the community has done for me. it is corny to say, but it is true. it really is what it is. that i would be able to see more pieces cleanup. >>" will check back in the future and see the fruits of conservation and revitalization efforts. if you would find out more or donate to the art carethe donate to the art carethe artsfartcommission.org. >> welcome to coulterwire. the san francisco arts commission and department of public works has joined forces by battling graffiti by launching a new program called street smarts. the program connects established artist with private property owners to create a vibrant murals which is a p
the age of eight years old. i saw perry mason when i was a child. my father used to take me to the court house to watch the lawyers practiced law when i was 8 years old. i believe in the mission. i believe -- i am a true believer. i think those images influence children. we have one here in the front row. some to serve as prosecutors first and then become criminal defense attorneys, but many of us want to defend the constitution and those rights from the very beginning, from jump. i think we do not just me to believe it in our hearts, we need to profess it publicly. i do believe, though, that jerry is right. it is not enough to talk about it amongst ourselves. it is a larger public dialogue that needs to happen in terms of the resources, the jury pool, and that means talking to people who identify more with victims. we now there are one in 100 people behind bars. that means one in 100 people knows somebody connected to the criminal justice system. that is a tremendous opportunity for us. that means there are people in every sector of society who identify with our cause. that is when peop
, a partnership between fiona's office and members of the city council and daily city. i use this as an example to help bridge the gap that we live in. we live in a food desert. we have very little access to good quality, healthy food. one of the things that i'm interested in bringing is with the development in universal paragon, the southern-most part of the city, there's an opportunity for us to first sustain the businesses that have been providing some food supplies as well asfh4jl- parth developers that understand our challenges and that are willing to bring healthy food options to the southeast part of san francisco. so to answer the question on bay vurek i'd like to see a farmer's market specifically designated on the hill. thank you. >> thank you very much. that minute is tough, we know. >> thank you. i'm christine inea. my ideas for bringing fresh produce into district 10 are as follows. one, support the opening of the fresh and easy market in third street on bay view. two, continue to support the redevelopment, which i believe will include a full service grocery store in visitation va
million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets that are under our feet. we have about two million miles of pipe in this nation. if you're walking around in an urban area, you're probably stepping on a pipe. man: our grandparents paid for, and put in for the first time, these large distribution systems. woman: and in many cases, it's not been touched since. man: we're at a critical turning point. much of that infrastructure is wearing out. narrator: our water infrastructure is made up of complex, underground systems that function continuously. these 10 locations t
mandate and buzz word to say "cars last." where is the grocery store? the fact of the matter is for us to get adequate grocers, we either go to walgreens or go to the 16th street safeway or tehe+iĆ”>u? foodsco where you ct buy meat. it is a challenge to raise a family. you have to put in services first, public transit second, and then we can worry about cars. >> one reason why have the no. 2 endorsement from the sierra club was the we spend too much of our land and resources on cars. we have eight times the asthma rate. a shorter life expectancy year. we have to get serious about addressing that. it is literally killing us. we need to make public transportation and other alternatives more attractive. we need to redesign our routes. we need dedicated lanes for bicycles and transit. we need better to language and access services. we need better shuttle buses and more reliable transfers. eventually, muni needs to be free to ride. we need to think big. >> i definitely think we need to put public transit -- more effort into fixing the public transit system. we need to expand on what our vi
see something, you take a breath, assess the situation, use all your senses and think about what you are going to do. those are all components of what we call the size-up. there are many components to size up. what's one of the components to size up? gathering facts. you want to assess the type of damage there is. what kind of situation is it? what is the issue? is it a medical problem? if it's a medical, is it a big hurt or a little hurt? is it a rescue situation and if it's a fire, do you have the resources to control or extinguish that fire? how about your situation, do you have all your people? do you have all the resources that you need? have you collected all the material that you need if you are going to start doing a lifting exercise because someone is trapped? because you never start a rescue, you never start a lifting exercise, never start anything, unless you know you are going to be able to finish it, have enough of the resources to do it. and do you have the right equipment? you need specialized equipment? do you have access to that? maybe, maybe not. so size up, you wan
stop. >> 1, 2, 3. >> make sure your back is straight. >> basically when you are using a ladder out there, make sure you keep the ladder 10 feet away from wires. make sure the ladder is secure, that it's on stable ground, that it's even. if it's on a hill, we really don't want you to use it on a hill, but if it's on a hill, make sure it's shimmieed with something stable. make sure it's at the right angle, we suggest 70 degrees. if you stick your hand on a rung, the angle of the ladder is about the right angle there. never let go of the ladder. stand in the center, climb straight up. if you climb on the edges of the rung, the ladder will go this way. look up so you know where you are going and you can see where you're going to climb. walk vertically. don't step off to the side of the ladder. kind of common sense. make sure you read chapter 7 through the . >> this class is managing a disaster. what happens and how do we fit in? emergency operation plan, everything is going to go through the mayor. you have the office of emergency services, everything is supposed to come together over
to fund a historic survey in the bay view project area. we can use the knowledge to create an historic district. we can create a lot of character in the bayview town center. we can do other things in the commercial quarters. there are two approaches to affordability. raising income is one we need to focus more attention on. >> mr. jackson? >> when we talk about housing, jobs, and careers, we do not go the step deeper we need to. what types of housing question if there is no clamoring for an abundance of market rate housing. this committee has a deficit in the affordable housing. -- this community has a deficit in affordable housing. we did not sign up to have the regional housing crisis of on our backs. we need a strategy to solve the foreclosure issues happening in our communities. we support is sustainable for affordable housing and affordable housing construction. we also need to ensure we have a cooperative land trust approach to ensure the when people are for closed on a home, the city can buy foreclosed property to help keep those people in their homes. when we talk about job dev
a staple for many of us. according to the california avocado commission, about 43% of all u.s. households buy avocados regularly now. so when you think of avocados, you probably think of this, right? guacamole. but today farmers and chefs are proving that avocados can be so much more. good. ok, sure, what's not to like about guacamole? i mean, we do eat a lot of it. in fact, more than 49 million pounds of avocados in the form of guacamole will be consumed on super bowl sunday alone. but at hawks restaurant in granite bay, they're exploring different ways to use the alligator pear, otherwise known as an avocado. >> we like using california avocados because they're grown as close as an avocado can be. these are from the simi valley. they're really versatile. they're rich. as you can see, we puree them. we serve them somewhat chunky. we can wrap things in them. they're just real versatile. and they're tasty. >> but chefs like michael are just part of the equation of educating consumers on the many fabulous attributes of avocados. the real groundwork begins just there, on the ground of the 6,
they are closed. we have to continue to push for a land use issues. 258 bed hospital is being built. we need to make sure they provide enough charity care to provide access to health care in this neighborhood and in this entire district. the program that i was working on -- we need to make sure it is not cut and ensure that our residents who are uninsured have access to health care. that's how you cut down the rates of health care, making sure that land use decisions do not adversely impact our decisions. >> mr. kelly. >> first, you have to make sure you keep district 10 together. we are together on exactly this issue. the biggest cause of the asthma rate here is the freeways. i've been advocating that we should take a serious look at seeing if we can anend 280. the city has proven that the one thing it can do well is to take down a freeway. we can maybe do the job here and would still have a boulevard that would serve mission bay. we need to get serious and invest resources in addressing the causes of pollution. we need more youth and family services. we need to look for further opportuniti
in use around the city. updated at regular intervals from the comfort of their home or workplace. next bus uses satellite technology and advanced computer modeling to track buses and trains, estimating are bought stocks with a high degree of accuracy. the bus and train our arrival information can be accessed from your computer and even on your cellular phone or personal digital assistant. knowing their arrival time of the bus allows riders the choice of waiting for it or perhaps doing some shopping locally or getting a cup of coffee. it also gives a greater sense that they can count on you to get to their destination on time. the next bus our arrival information is also transmitted to bus shelters around the city equipped with the next bus sign. riders are updated strictly about arrival times. to make this information available, muni has tested push to talk buttons at trial shelters. rider when pushes the button, the text is displayed -- when a rider pushes the button. >> the success of these tests led to the expansion of the program to all stations on the light rail and is part of the
access to health care. that's how you cut down the rates of health care, making sure that land use decisions do not adversely impact our decisions. >> mr. kelly. >> first, you have to make sure you keep district 10 together. we are together on exactly this issue. the biggest cause of the asthma rate here is the freeways. i've been advocating that we should take a serious look at seeing if we can anend 280. the city has proven that the one thing it can do well is to take down a freeway. we can maybe do the job here and would still have a boulevard that would serve mission bay. we need to get serious and invest resources in addressing the causes of pollution. we need more youth and family services. we need to look for further opportunities to get people out of cars. and we need to address this. we need people out of their cars. >> i agree with the throat examination of the transportation needs of the district. that would tell us whether or not taking out one of the freeways would be a viable plan. there needs to be a study that shows the particular matters coming from the freeway cor
, we can use that definitely has a tourist site. that will be our biggest tourist site in district 10 probably. >> i worked in dogpatch. a cruise ship would stop off. the people would get on the bus to get out of there. they did not realize when they were being let off there. we have a waterfront in district 10, but we do not seem to understand it because we do not have access to it. the way you bring tourists to district 10 is by bringing back the waterfront. you can bring it back with better wetlands, better recreational opportunities, redeveloping. 70 -- pier 70. in the zoo world-class asset that is sinking into the bay. but -- it is a world-class asset that is sinking into the bay. it has the best weather ever. it has an interesting shoreline with a great history. we need to tell the story in a way that people can visit and enjoy it, including the residents and not just the tourists. >> mr. smith? >> i love living at dogpatch. it is wonderful to live there. it is sunny and not foggy. there is good food. there is a new ice cream store that i should not be going to. i would like to
have to get beyond what you're used to. as long as people recognize they're moving to the desert and give up this notion that they have to bring eastern vegetation with them and make the necessary adaptations in their own life, desert communities can continue to live. man: the biggest water user in the desert is turf. turf uses a lot of irrigation and uses spray irrigation, so what we've done here is use artificial turf. you're never going to be able to achieve the look of back east or the look of, say, california, with subtropical plants, but our landscapes are still lush and use about 30% of what the subtropical landscape with turf would use. las vegas has adopted a drought tolerant ordinance. we're using less water today than we used five years ago, despite over 300,000 new residents. i think it's a pretty amazing example as to how a town can really turn on a dime if there's the political will and if the public gets behind it. narrator: even the casinos and resorts have adapted to efficient water use. mulroy: the las vegas strip uses only 3% of all the water that we deliver. a
changed the practice in santa clara. i want to start with amy and if you can tell us what is "ordinary injustice" and how does it manifest itself? >> ordinary injustice happens in a courtroom where there are smart, committed, hard-working people, professionals. but they are routinely acting in ways that fall short. what it is that people and their positions are supposed to be doing. and they don't even realize that anything is missing or that their behavior has devastating consequences for regular people's lives. so this is really the meaning of ordinary injustice that mistakes become routine and the legal professionals can no longer see their role in them. >> can you give us some examples of what you found in your eight-year saga of studying the court system? >> sure. the best way to perhaps get into it is to tell you how i first came across it. i had just graduated law school from stanford and i had clerked for a federal appellate judge in miami and the jurisdiction was florida, alabama and georgia and i wrote a story after my clerkship for the "nation" magazine and it was picked up
protection. gloves, eye protection, and masks and sanitation and hand washing and who among us don't have a nick or a cut on their hand and are you going to touch someone's blood and your in tac skin will protect you from most ilknows. however, if you have a cut on your hand you have a path for infection to get inside of you and you want a pair of latex gloves -- several pairs of glo gloves that you can put on and change as you go from patient t patient hopefully and at least wash your hands and disinfect your hands between patient contacts and the eyes are like an open wound and path to get into your body and glasses and take the old glasses and throw them in your kit and you have something to wear and face mask and of course dust and dirt and all of these disasters throw up dust and dirt and especially in a dryer season and push comes t shove a band da bandana. and after a disaster is not the time to let your hygiene slip and it's a time to tighten it u and communitycable diseases and if it's wet and not yours don't touch it. gloves and every patient contac and don't touch blood and it'
city in the u.s. and over 40 million tourists visit the city every year. the 1.3 billion gallons of water required every day are delivered by a system of extraordinary scale and complex engineering. man: water is essential to the economic viability of new york city. reliable infrastructure and reliable delivery of water is a must. you have to reinvest in the infrastructure every single minute to keep it current. hurwitz: we have the stock exchange, we have the united nations -- failure can have a dramatic impact on the nation, and even internationally. so there's a really keen awareness that you always have to be fixing the system. things corrode, they rust. they get to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny, that making any accommodation to shut it down, to do something to it, is very difficult. narrator: two massive underground tunnels, called simply tunnel 1 and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. built at the beginning of the 20th cent
should always be proud of what it is that we do for people and in fact, what they return to us. we are made better by the work that we do and may god bless all of your efforts. thank you. [applause] >> thank you, jose. the event today is also sponsored by the california attorneys for criminal justice. i also want to especially thank the rosenberg foundation and executive director tim solard who provided a grant to make this possible so thank you so much the rosenberg foundation and of course i want to thank all the volunteers who worked so hard to make this event happen today. now i'm very excited to introduce our keynote speaker. our keynote speaker is and was the first "lady lawyer" in california. it's true. because when she decided that she wanted to become a lawyer, there was one problem, the law in california didn't allow it. and so she had to change the law, which she did. she also wanted to go to law school right here at hastings college of law but they had a policy that said only men could go do that law school so she sued hastings college of the law and she changed that an
it over, and the judges were telling us, you are making a mountain out of a molehill. little did we know there was all this bubbling underneath, so it is true the onus of the burden is on the defense, because once we have the information we have to file the motion. it is a tremendous amount of work we have to do, but what we need to do is make sure there is a process so people who were convicted can bring their cases back to court. our next question from the audience says, in santa clara county when people plead guilty to misdemeanors, what happened? did they go to jail? for how long? what type of crimes? >> one of the chief dynamics that was happening was that many people were faced with a choice between staying in jail sometimes up to a week or even longer waiting for a public defender to get to their case for just to get out right fair, -- right there, because the judge was basically saying, plead guilty. what is the big deal? that was the impression. everybody was taking the deal. you could almost see them talking to each other. you could see them make that decision. any pointed out
to the prosecutors, he had never seen a case that has seen more of use in his career. attorney general holder was right in terms of acting swiftly, in terms of throwing out that condition. he also stated that the department of justice's office of professional responsibility would investigate the actions of the two officers, yet a year after that, we still have heard nothing out of office regarding their conduct. the department of justice has publicly talked about how they increased training in terms of discovery obligations, and they have issued memos in terms of what they are supposed to be doing, yet they have yet to do anything regarding the behavior of those prosecutors. contrast that to the case that occurred a couple years ago, that boasts -- that of the prosecutor in north carolina, where six months after the charges were brought against the lacrosse students, and they were charged with rape, the defense attorneys uncovered evidence in the files, and north carolina is open, but they found evidence in the files showing their clients were innocent. the state attorney general immediately
was the confederate cemetery. from the courthouse, they flew two flags -- the u.s. flag and the confederate battle flag, which was the state flag of south carolina. from the court room, i could look out the window and seaport sumter in the distance -- see fort sumter. they put me on a case with no marijuana. they invented imaginary marijuana. they said i was charged with conspiring to contribute 10 tons of colombian marijuana. i pled not guilty. i had a jury trial. i was found guilty on one account, acquitted on nine. i had an appellate case and the supreme court case. i was then facing 15 years. since may to nine. when i went to federal prison, i did time in eight different states in nine different federal prisons, including four penitentiaries -- that is a maximum security. including the united states penitentiary at marion, the first super federal max. that is on a marijuana convention. -- conviction. i spent most of my time in solitary confinement. you do not know this, but if you plead not duty and you get a jury trial and then you have an appellate case, you go directly to solitary confineme
. the only of us who can get it are people with health insurance. anyone will tell you on the street we need residential drug treatment. take some of these dam presence, take down the gun towers, turned into a residential drug treatment centers -- some of these damned prisons. >> what are your suggestions as to the reform? one area we have not really talked about much is the impact of technology. where is that going now, and how do we need to expend that? how do we deal with the information that is being disseminated, how do we slow that down? are there other areas that also are bleeding into employment and housing, and what is the solution, is my question? he>> there has been a real leadership on the country to come up with smarter ideas, and we have had a lot of good examples and policies, state and federal for the past 10 years or so, so the reform agenda is not that big a secret. they have been a lot of reports that put it together in one place. i think the real challenge that has been touched on is really leadership, and a lot of it has to do with leadership and people really stepping u
, and there are great presidents behind us -- president behind us that could give us insight into who we are. >> oliver road trip on her website. check at often. new experiences will be added after every stop.
use for dog poop. >> proenvironmental policies, that's a way to win hearts and that's a way to win hearts and minds. do you like this top? that's so gay. really? yeah. it's totally gay. you know, you really shouldn't say that.
] is here with us tonight. [inaudible] dancing. step dancing which we are familiar with. you may have seen this before. this will be a treat. [applause]. >> someone once told me this was from scandanavia. this is a different version. about 2 sisters that fall in love with the same guy. it didn't work out too well. one of the sisters throws another one into the raging water. he fashions her body into a fiddle, into a violin. this is the actual violin. i love her so much. [singing] [music playing] [applause] [music playing] [applause] knew >> we are going to finish off a with [inaudible]. yeah. [applause]. [music playing]. >> [applause]. >> [applause]. >> cents and cisco's buses and trains serve many writers -- san francisco buses and trains serve many riders. the need to be sure they can get off at their intended stop. the digital voice announcement system, which announces upcoming stops, can help these low vision riders know where they are, but only if set properly. >> it is a wonderful piece of technology, but in practice, it is a little bit more tricky. oftentimes, i find that the automa
. and it is the law. >> i use the p a system to make sure everyone on the bus here is my announcements. >> i have had both experiences with the loudness and the to stop for the announcements. you are never going to have it exactly balanced for every trip because your level of noise changes. the announcement system ranges from 1 to 10. 10 would be too loud, a little distorted. eight is a good number. not too loud, but loud enough for everyone to hear and understand what is going on. >> i think bus drivers might not be aware of the fact that if you let a visually impaired person off at the wrong stop, number one, they may be absolutely unfamiliar with the area they are in. >> the driver overshot the stock that i wanted. i decided to get off and find my way back, but it was very disorienting, not exactly understanding how far i was. number 2, it might be a potentially dangerous situation if they do not know the area and are attempting to make crossings that they are unfamiliar with. >> they let me off somewhere else. i had no idea where i was. i missed the stop, and the bus was gone. then, i look around
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